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8/27/2017 11:42:00 AM
Purdue's campus housing is maxed out. So what happens now?
Purdue University freshman Brandon Wolter waits at a bus stop outside Blackbird Farms Apartments on Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. Wolter is one of 240 students who were placed in Blackbird apartments due to overflow in on-campus residential halls. Staff photo: Meghan Holden/Journal & Courier
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Purdue University freshman Brandon Wolter waits at a bus stop outside Blackbird Farms Apartments on Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. Wolter is one of 240 students who were placed in Blackbird apartments due to overflow in on-campus residential halls. Staff photo: Meghan Holden/Journal & Courier


Meghan Holden, Journal and Courier

WEST LAFAYETTE — Brandon Wolter's living situation is unlike that of most Purdue University freshmen who choose to live in residential housing.

Rather than sleeping in a cramped dorm room, Wolter shares a spacious two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment with three other freshmen. 

The residence comes with amenities one would expect in a luxury apartment, such as a balcony, a full kitchen with a dishwasher, a washer and dryer, and free parking. There's also a pool and fitness center across the street.

The catch? He lives about two miles outside campus and is a 10-minute bus ride away from the thousands of other freshmen living in the dorms.

"The worst part is planning ahead," Wolter said while waiting at a bus stop Wednesday morning to venture to campus for the day.

Wolter is one of 240 male students who were placed in Blackbird Farms apartments this fall. They're housed in a new subdivision at the corner of McCormick Road and Lindberg Road, across the street from the existing Blackbird Farms complexes.

RENTING NEAR PURDUE?: What students and landlords should know about renting

This is the first year Purdue has contracted with Blackbird, owned by Lafayette-based W.H. Long Companies, to house students, said Mike Shettle, administration director for Purdue University Residences. It also marks the second year the university has had to partner with a private company to meet the increasing demand of campus housing.

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