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3/9/2017 6:46:00 PM
White supremacist efforts swell across the nation's campuses, report says
About 70 students and faculty gather outside Purdue University's Hovde Hall on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. The demonstration was against the white supremacist posters found around campus Nov. 30 and Purdue President Mitch Daniels' response to the incident. Staff photo by Meghan Holden
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About 70 students and faculty gather outside Purdue University's Hovde Hall on Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. The demonstration was against the white supremacist posters found around campus Nov. 30 and Purdue President Mitch Daniels' response to the incident. Staff photo by Meghan Holden


Meghan Holden, Journal and Courier

WEST LAFAYETTE — Posters from a white supremacist group found at Purdue University last semester marks just one episode in a surge of white supremacist recruitment efforts on U.S. college campuses this school year, according to a report.

The Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism tracked more than 100 incidents of white supremacist fliering on campuses since September, according to a report released by the center on Monday. Many of the incidents — 60 percent of them — have taken place since January.

"White supremacist engagement tactics on campus range from the virtual, such as sending racist fliers to thousands of campus fax machines, to on the ground rallies and speaking engagements," a news release from the center said. "More extremists are also making a point of visiting campuses to speak with students individually. This is part of a push to move their activism from online chatter to 'real world' action."

American Vanguard, a Southern California-based group that took responsibility for the posters at Purdue, was listed as the organization responsible for the majority of fliers and campus campaigns tracked over the last several months.

Identity Evropa and American Renaissance were mentioned as the two other main groups that are waging more forceful campaigns to establish a physical presence on campuses. The language in their propaganda tends to focus on white guilt and the notion of people from European descent "taking back America."

The fliers at Purdue included statements such as, "Defending your people is a social duty, not an anti-social crime," accompanied by a drawing of a white woman with a baby.

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